On every census: Mary Ann Carley (1830-1918)

There can’t be many people that appear on each easily accessible census (1841-1911 inclusive) in the same parish, but Mary Ann Carley (also nee Carley) is one of them.

Born on 27 October 1830, she was baptised at Rendham Independent chapel (England and Wales, Non-Conformist and Non-Parochial Registers; RG4; Piece Number 2356), the daughter of Richard and Mary Anne Carley. As the first name on the first schedule for Badingham in 1911, she has the honour of being individual 0001 on my master index!

The 1841 census places her with her parents (farmers) and her brothers and sisters: Samuel, Betsy, Sarah, John and Ellen. (1841 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 18; Page 3). Ten years later, at ‘Old Mill Road’, the family make up was the same but for the addition of Martha, Richard and Robert. (1851 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 10b; Page 4). Next came her marriage:

Marriages – On the 18th, at Rendham Chapel, by the Rev. G. Hinde, Mr Joshua Carley, to Miss Carley, both of Badingham.

(The Suffolk Chronicle; 29 October 1859; Page 2)

By 1861, the couple were farming 119 acres in the village. (1861 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 13c; Page 2). Ten years later the couple had the same acreage, on Laxfield Road, and were living with their 14-year-old niece Alice and a domestic servant. (1871 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 3, Page 3). 

The Chapel was an important part of their lives, and Mary Ann later appears in the Framlingham Weekly News at a bazaar raising funds for it –

“The refreshment tent was to the left of the entrance and this department was under the able management of Mrs Joshua Carley, of Badingham, the prices charged for refreshments being very reasonable and consequently satisfactory to the attendants.”

(Framlingham Weekly News; 6 July 1878; Page 4)

The 1880s show repeated mentions of Mary Ann’s husband Joshua in the local press as he was elected to be a Guardian for the parish of Badingham. In 1881 they remained farming 119 acres (1881 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 3; Page 2) and in 1891, their address was given as Beech Farm, Old Mill Road (1891 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 3; Page 2).

In 1901, Joshua (80) and Mary Ann (70), were enumerated at the White House – the first time it was explicitly recorded as such on the census. (1901 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 2; Page 8). It would be Joshua’s last census. He died on 4 January 1908 ‘having reached the great age of nearly 88 years’. His obituary in the Framlingham Weekly News noted that he had spent most of his manhood in Badingham, entering White House Farm from Mary Ann’s father almost 50 years before (Mill Road, if you turn left at the post box, becomes Laxfield Road, which may explain the census addresses).  The funeral, at Badingham, must have taken place during a period of bad weather as the obituary notes that many of his personal friends were prevented by illness and the ‘unpropitious state of the weather’ from attending. (Framlingham Weekly News; 11 January 1908; Page 4).

Mary Anne was enumerated on Schedule Number One as a farmer in her own right in 1911. She was living at the Old White House, where she had seven rooms (not including the usual exceptions) shared with her widowed sister Ellen Brock, her nephew Samuel Green Carley (the parish enumerator), and two other women. (1911 Census; Badingham, Suffolk; ED 1, SN 1).

Ten years after her husband’s death, Mary Anne was still at the White House, where she died on 26 August 1918. Like her husband, she was nearly 88. (Framlingham Weekly News; 31 August 1918; Page 3).

How many other Badingham residents can claim a similar record of census entries – and most likely in the same farmhouse at that – remains to be seen.

 

 

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